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Plain Jane? Plain Wrong

Plain Jane? Plain Wrong

There is nothing ‘common-place’ about Pride and Prejudice. It has a tightly woven, seductively intricate plot, which unfolds so delicately that the reader falls blindly into the traps of imperception set by the author, alongside that most perfect of imperfect heroines, Elizabeth Bennet. It has dialogue which sparkles and sings in the most extraordinary way, so that characters come alive in only a few words. It has a hero and heroine who fence and fight and fall in love . . .
SF magazine subscribers only
Too Much Clevverness

Too Much Clevverness

Hoban started writing Riddley Walker in 1974 and finished it five years later. It is a masterpiece. Those who know it love it, and whole websites are devoted to it, with chapter-by-chapter annotations deciphering the language, and online chat rooms discussing its themes. In 2005 a Russell Hoban Some-Poasyum (a symposium in Riddleyspeak) was held in London, with readings, quizzes and a pilgrimage to Kent to visit locations in the novel. Every 4 February, Russell Hoban’s birthday, die-hard fans leave typed quotations from his novels in random places for strangers to find.
SF magazine subscribers only
Sound Nonsense

Sound Nonsense

The words rolled out, natural and clear, and I listened with new ears and understanding. Enlightenment had finally come. Passages spoken aloud in an Irish accent, by someone who loved the prose enough to commit long passages to memory, released the book’s power. Its beauty had been unlocked not by a literary intellectual, but by a half-tight man in a cheap suit standing at the bar of a Dublin pub. Finnegans Wake was revealed as a work of sound rather than sense, a form of high falutin, Gaelic, literary rap. Ireland talking in her sleep. It was as if Brian had taken me by the elbow, and guided me into this particular tavern to receive a final, Celtic benediction.
SF magazine subscribers only
20th May 2009

‘If the rules of ‘Desert Island Discs’ allow a periodical instead of a book . . .’

‘I'm not sure if the rules of 'Desert Island Discs' allow a periodical instead of a book; but if they do – and no doubt the people at Hoxton Square could arrange delivery by homing albatross – I'd go for a subscription to Slightly Foxed and ration myself, very strictly, to an article a week . . . And I know I'd still read it in one go the day it arrived.’
- Tim Mackintosh-Smith
From readers
20th May 2009

‘Beautifully produced . . .’

‘Absolutely beautifully produced.’
- BBC Radio 4 Today
From readers
20th May 2009

Time Out

‘Packed with anecdotes, reminiscences and essays about books, writers and the trade. If you love books you'll love Slightly Foxed.’
- Time Out
From the press

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