• Pages: 256
  • Illustrations: Integrated black and white illustrations
  • ISBN: 9781472951298
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Binding: Hardback

Notes from the Cévennes

Adam Thorpe

Half a Lifetime in Provincial France
From£18.99

SF Subscriber Prices

UK & Ireland £18.99 *save £2
Overseas £20.99 *save £2

Non-Subscriber Prices

UK & Ireland £20.99
Overseas £22.99
  • Gift wrap available
  • All prices include P&P. Overseas rates & subscriber discounts will be applied once you have selected a shipping type for each item during the checkout process.
  • Pre-order
Non Slightly Foxed title: Minimum 5-10 day delivery time.
Order Now
For urgent orders call us on 020 7033 0258 || Non-Slightly Foxed produced items will not be dispatched before c. 7 January || For Christmas delivery (UK) you must select First Class or Special Delivery shipping and order before 12 p.m. on Wednesday 18 December. ● If you are a current subscriber to the quarterly your basket will update to show any discounts before the payment page during checkout ● If you want to subscribe now and buy books or goods at the member rate please add a subscription to your basket before adding other items ● Gift wrap, messages and delivery instructions may be added during the checkout process ● If you need help please send us a message using the form in the bottom left of your screen and we’ll be in touch as soon as we’re back at our desks.

The Cévennes has long-inspired writer Adam Thorpe, who has drawn on the legends, history and above all the people of this part of France for his inspiration. In his charming journal, Notes from the Cévennes, he takes up these themes, writing about his surroundings, the village and his house at the heart of it, as well as the contrasts of city life in nearby Nîmes.

Adam Thorpe’s home for the past 25 years has been an old house in the Cévennes. Part celebration of both rustic and urban France, part memoir, he explores the attic once used as a silk factory and contemplates the stamp of a chance paw in a fragment of Roman roof-tile; elsewhere, he ponders mutilated fleur-de-lys on his study door and unwittingly uses the tomb-rail of two sisters buried in the garden as a gazebo. Then there are the personal fragments that make up a life and a family history: memories dredged up by ‘dusty toys, dried-up poster paints, a painted clay lump in the bottom of a box.’

 

Leave your review